Shower Hour - On the House

Shower Hour

By on October 10, 2020
Shower Hour

Want to know where to get your next shower door, or how to prevent fires in your home? Look no further!

Replacing Your Shower Door?  

What to Know 

Upgrading your bathroom with a new glass shower enclosure is a great way to add value to your home. Even simple upgrades such as new hardware and fixtures can give your bathroom a facelift that boosts your return on investment. But you may be wondering, how much does a new shower door cost? There’s no simple answer. Prices can range from a few hundred dollars for a simple glass door to thousands for a luxurious, high-end enclosure. There are many considerations that affect the price. These include material selection and the difficulty of the installation. The more complicated the job, the more difficult it will be. 

Let’s take a look at some options: 

Shower Door Glass Options 

When trying to determine, how much does a new shower door cost, there are a number of different options. You’ll also need to decide whether you want a full bathroom remodel or to simply upgrade what you already have. Keep in mind that a remodel will be much more involved and sometimes requires structural work. 

Bypass Shower Door or Hinged Shower Door 

Bypass shower doors slide past one another the same way as asliding patio door. A bypass shower door may have a set pane with one side sliding on a track, or both panels of glass can move. The track can either have manual rollers in it, or the sliding piece can glide without extra support. These shower doors are space-efficient, as they don’t require room to swing open. 

Hinged and pivot shower doors both open on hinges, but there are some differences. Ahinged shower door opens only in one direction, usually outward. A pivot shower door also opens on a hinge, but can open in either direction. That swinging action of both doors is a benefit and a drawback. They create a bigger opening and access to the tub or shower enclosure, but also require enough room in the space to fully open the door. Both hinged and pivot shower doors are usually found in stand-alone shower enclosures, as they can fit into smaller spaces, where bypass shower doors would be too wide. 

Neo-Angle or Round Shower Door 

Sliding, hinged and pivot doors can all be installed without a tub, as well, while options such as neo-angle and round shower doors are typically used only with standalone showers. They are made for showers that take up a corner space of the bathroom and comprise set pieces of glass anchored perpendicularly to the walls. They also have a shower door that connects the two side pieces of glass. 

A round shower door is similar to a neo-angle door, but is made with bent or curved glass. These doors are hinged and generally open in one direction only. 

Framed or Frameless Shower 

Another option that can significantly affect the question, how much does a new shower door cost, is deciding between framed or frameless. Because the frame supports the door,framed optionsare usually made with a thin glass, typically3/16- or ¼-inch. The frame is often made of aluminum and can be coated, painted or finished in a variety of colors. 

Frameless doors must be made with a much thicker glass, usually 3/8- or ½-inch, because there is no supporting frame. As a result of the thicker glass, frameless shower doors are usually more expensive than framed options. 

Shower Glass Selection 

Whatever style you choose, glass selection is another consideration that can impact the price. While there are many glass choices, it’s important to know that all shower doors must be constructed with safety glazing. Tempered glass is most common. When it breaks,tempered glassshatters into pellets, rather than shards, which could cause significant injury to people. 

Laminated glassis another safety glazing option, though not as common in shower doors. Laminated glass consists of at least two pieces of glass and one plastic interlayer that form a glass sandwich. If the glass breaks, the plastic interlayer holds it in place, keeping the glass from falling out. 

Unique Shower Glass Options         

Tempered glass comes in a variety of patterns, textures and colors, but keep in mind that veering beyond clear glass will increase the cost. Options include frosted glass, which provides privacy, as well as patterned or other decorative glass options. Some homeowners even opt for custom-made, decorative glass shower doors created to their specific needs and aesthetics. 

For most homeowners, however, clear glass remains the most popular option, as it creates a clean, modern look. 

Low Maintenance Shower Options 

You can also upgrade your shower door glass with a low-maintenance or easy-to-clean coating. This option typically is applied as part of the glass fabrication process. The coating application affects how quickly water runs down the glass, and how dirt and other substances are removed. The theory is that since the water washes away the dirt and grime from the glass, you won’t need to clean the glass with soap or glass cleaner as frequently as you would without the specialty coating. 

There are two different kinds of low-maintenance coatings: hydrophilic and hydrophobic. With hydrophilic glass the water runs in sheets, rather than single drops, off the glass. Hydrophobic glass essentially repels water, preventing most dirt and contaminants from bonding to the glass. If you are interested in low-maintenance options, ask your shower door installer for more information when you’re researching and reviewing quotes. 

Ready to Shower Shop 

There’s not a simple answer to the question “how much does a new shower door cost?” Many considerations go into the final selection, from door style to glass type to the complexity of the installation. Here’s a quick look at price ranges for different types of shower doors. 

Standard Bypass Shower Door:$600-$900 

Hinged Shower Door:$1200-$1600 

Sliding Shower Door:$1400-$1600 

Corner Shower Door:$1400-$1600 

Curved Shower Door:$1500-$1800 

Custom Fully Enclosed Shower:$1900-$3500 

 

 

WHY DO BIRDS FLY INTO WINDOWS? 

YOU CAN PREVENT IT 

Here’s what you can do to stop them from hitting your home, according to an expert from the National Audubon Society. 

Nothing is more startling than when a wild bird flies into the window. After all, it would seem odd that birds—having exceptional navigation systems and knowingwhere to go when they fly southevery winter—would collide headfirst into a pane of glass. So, why is it socommon for birdsto fly into windows and how can we help prevent it? “Birds fly into windows because they don’t perceive them as hard barriers,” explains John Rowden, senior director of bird-friendly communities at theNational Audubon Society. “They may see mirror-like reflections in the glass thatlook like space or habitatthat is appropriate to fly towards or they don’t see the glass at all if it’s transparent and there’s something on the other side they want to fly toward.” 

But flying into a window can be fatal ifthe bird is on a migration pathor trying to escape a predator. Birds tend to fly at faster speeds in those situations and could become confused when they see what appears to be an empty space; the impact could cause significant injuries for the birds. Is there anything you can do? 

How to Prevent It 

The best way toprotect wild birdsfrom flying into your windows is to ensure that your windows are, in fact, visible. “If people want to make glass visible to birds, there are a number of ways to do it—often with things they may already have around the house,” says Rowden. “People can use decals, stickers, string, paint, tape—anything that birds can see and avoid—to create a pattern on the glass that will help the birds see it as a barrier and avoid it.” You can do this in several ways, including patterned window film, screens, or nets. When you aren’t using the window, you cankeep the external shades or shutters closedso that birds don’t fly into your window, or else placedecorative decals over the windowsto deter birds from the area. The sound of wind chimes may also keep them away. And if you want to watch the birds and still keep them safe,move the bird feederwithin three feet of the window. It lessens the chance that they’ll gain enough speed to hurt themselves on the window if they need toescape a surprise predator. 

Smallbirds see even small gapsas passages,” explains Rowden, “so the general rule is that the pattern created should have gaps that are no larger than four inches side to side and two inches top to bottom (some recommendations are even smaller—no bigger than two by two inches, since hummingbirds and other tiny birds can fly into small spaces).” Therefore, this is something that you will want to keep in mind as you prepare your windows. Visual barriers should also be placed outside of the window in order to eliminate the mirror effect. 

 

 

Evaluating the State of the Roof 

Because water is usually a house’s main enemy, spend time examining the roof—the first line of defense against rain, snow, and ice. Few homeowners would allow a prospective buyer on a sloped roof, whether fearing roof damage or a fall. Even if you’re sure-footed and could obtain permission, it’s probably wiser to stay on the ground. Use your binoculars to take a closer look, unless, of course, you’ll be inspecting a flat roof. 

Roof Checkpoints 

Sight along the ridge to see if it’s straight. If the ridge sags in the middle, suspect too many layers of roofing or undersize rafters. If the roof sags between rafters, the roof sheathing may be too thin and should be replaced during the next reroofing. 

Next, look for flashing at the bases of chimneys and plumbing vents. These objects can dam water and allow it to leak through the roof. If flashing is absent, rusty, or otherwise deteriorated, there’s a good chance of water damage. 

The valleys between roof sections should be flashed because they carry a lot of water. Thus, where roof planes converge, you should see either metal flashing down the valley (an open valley) or interwoven shingles (a closed valley). 

Drip-edge is specialized flashing that should protrude from beneath the lowest courses of roofing. It allows water to drip clear of the roof. Older homes lacking drip-edges often suffer water damage because water soaks backward under sheathing onto the tops of walls. 

Wherever roofs adjoin walls or dormer walls, look for roof-to-wall and step flashings. At brick chimneys, consider whether saddle and step flashings are properly counter flashed. 

Asphalt Shingles 

If the granular surface of asphalt shingles is worn and if shingles are cupped and dog-eared, it’s time for a new roof. Ditto if gutters contain a significant amount of gravel washed off the surface of the shingles. 

If the roofing is lumpy and uneven, there are probably two or more layers of shingles that weren’t well installed. They’ll need to be stripped to the sheathing before reroofing. 

Do you see odd-colored shingles? If so, they are probably patches over old leaks. Or if the roof is relatively new and shingles are worn in only one area, perhaps one bundle of shingles was defective. 

A roof less than five years old with a large number of loose or missing shingles indicates that the installer’s power nailer was set too deep and drove the nails through the shingles. In this case, that roofing needs to be replaced. 

Wood Shingles and Shakes 

Shingle wear will almost always be greater on a south-facing roof because that side gets the most sun. If shingle ends are cupping and splitting, plan to reroof soon. 

Mossy shingles or shakes are common in wet climates and on shady roof sections. Although moss-covered shingles can be relatively sound, moss retains water and will induce rot. 

If the house is in a fire-risk area, insurers may refuse to give a policy on a wood-shingle or wood-shake roof. In this case, replace it with noncombustible roofing. 

Slate Shingles 

Do not attempt to walk on slate roofs. Even when dry, they’re slippery. Slate also is brittle and breaks easily. 

Off-color areas may indicate replacement shingles in an area damaged by a falling tree limb. Later, when you are in the attic, check for water stains on supporting lumber. 

If you see rust-colored streaks or cockeyed slates, the installer may have used nails that weren’t galvanized, which by now have rusted through. Although it’s possible to remove and renail slate, the job requires a costly specialist. However, if many nails have rusted through, the roof is dangerous, and the slate should be removed. 

Do you see odd-colored shingles? If so, they are probably patches over old leaks. Or if the roof is relatively new and shingles are worn in only one area, perhaps one bundle of shingles was defective. 

A roof less than five years old with a large number of loose or missing shingles indicates that the installer’s power nailer was set too deep and drove the nails through the shingles. In this case, that roofing needs to be replaced. 

Wood Shingles and Shakes 

Shingle wear will almost always be greater on a south-facing roof because that side gets the most sun. If shingle ends are cupping and splitting, plan to reroof soon. 

Mossy shingles or shakes are common in wet climates and on shady roof sections. Although moss-covered shingles can be relatively sound, moss retains water and will induce rot. 

If the house is in a fire-risk area, insurers may refuse to give a policy on a wood-shingle or wood-shake roof. In this case, replace it with noncombustible roofing. 

Slate Shingles 

Do not attempt to walk on slate roofs. Even when dry, they’re slippery. Slate also is brittle and breaks easily. 

Off-color areas may indicate replacement shingles in an area damaged by a falling tree limb. Later, when you are in the attic, check for water stains on supporting lumber. 

If you see rust-colored streaks or cockeyed slates, the installer may have used nails that weren’t galvanized, which by now have rusted through. Although it’s possible to remove and renail slate, the job requires a costly specialist. However, if many nails have rusted through, the roof is dangerous, and the slate should be removed. 

Roof Tiles 

Stay off tile roofs. Even when the slope isn’t steep, your weight could damage the tiles. Inspect them from an extension ladder or with binoculars. 

Look for odd-colored tiles from earlier repairs. Obviously cracked or broken tiles can be replaced, but the job is costly. Under the roof, check for water stains. 

Look closely at the ridge. Sagging ridge and rafters suggest too much weight on the framing. It’s a big expense to remove the tiles, bolster or replace sagging rafters, replace sheathing, and then replace tiles. 

Metal Roofing 

Stay off metal roofs. They are slippery, whether wet or dry. 

Even though a rusty roof may not look great, it could be watertight with a lot of years left in it. Roofs with superficial rust can be sanded and repainted. Check for evidence of leaks in the attic. 

Roofing panels should be nailed at the high point of metal folds. If you see many nails in the roofing channels themselves—where the water runs—the installation was inept, and you’ll need a new roof. 

Built-up Roofing 

On older built-up roofs, there were alternating layers of heavy building paper and hot tar, covered with light-colored gravel to reflect sunlight and protect the surface from ultraviolet (UV) damage. More recently, modified bitumen (MB) has largely replaced hot tar and paper. MB roofs typically have cap membranes “torched on” (heated with a propane flame) to fuse them to fiberglass-reinforced interplies, or base coats. 

Blisters in built-up roofs are usually caused by trapped water. Individual blisters can be patched with three-course patches, but if blisters are widespread, it’s time to reroof. 

Foot traffic can abrade and puncture flat roofs. If you find no evidence of water damage below, you can spot-patch abused areas, lay down new gravel, lock the door to the roof, and consider yourself lucky. 

Most leaks occur at turn-ups, where the flat roof joins walls, parapets, and other vertical surfaces. If the turn-up surfaces are cracked, split, sagging, or unpainted, water may have gotten in and done damage. A large amount of tar at the base of walls may indicate inadequate flashing and frequent repairs. 

Cracking or blistering around downspout outlets and internal drains indicates inadequate maintenance. Are there wire baskets in the openings? Are openings free of debris? If you have doubts, flush the outlets with a hose to see how well they drain. 

Is the flashing around plumbing vents sound? This is not a major repair, but it can indicate
general neglect.  

 

It’s National Fire Prevention Week 

Plan And PracticeYour Escape 

In a typical home fire, residents may have as little as one to two minutes to escape safely from the time the smoke alarm sounds. Escape planning and practice can help them make the most of the time they have, giving everyone enough time to get out. 

How to make a home fire escape plan:  

Draw a map or floor plan of your home. Show all windows and doors.  

Mark two ways out of each room.  

Choose a meeting place outside in front of your home. Draw a picture of your outside meeting place on your escape plan. 

Write the emergency telephone number for the fire department on your escape plan.  

Practice your plan at least two times a year.  

Fire is FAST!  

In less than 30 seconds a small flame can turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill your home. Fire spreads too quickly and the smoke is too thick. There is only a short time to escape.  

Fire is HOT!  

Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. If you inhale this super-hot air, it will scorch your lungs.  

Fire is DARK!  

Fire starts bright, but quickly makes black smoke and complete darkness. If you wake up to a fire you may be blinded, disoriented and unable to find your way around your home.  

Fire is DEADLY!  

Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do. The odorless, colorless fumes can lull you into a deep sleep before the flames reach your door. You may not wake up in time to escape.  

Thank You to our Interviewee!

Jack Healy of Soluna Copper–President

Land phone line contact number:

360-321-2131, press “0” and ask for Jack

 

Mentioned Links 

Thank you~ 

A very special thank you to all of our callers! We live to answer your questions, so keep them coming! 

Thank you to our Technical Support: 

  • Danny Bringer – Chief Engineer  
  • Carol “Remodeling Babe” Carey – Executive Producer  
  • Sam Reed – Associate Producer  
  • Rico Figliolini – Digital Master 

 

Thank you for tuning in to Shower Hour! And check in next week for more cool tips! 

“Shower Hour” Show Notes for On The House with the Carey Brothers aired October 10, 2020. 

Missed our live show? Don’t worry! Because we have a podcast of the show. It’s the same thing we aired on the radio, but ready for you whenever and wherever you are! Check it out here. 

 

 

About Samantha Reed

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