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 Thursday, January 18th, 2018
House Pets with Sandy Robins
Features   |   On The House Show and Tell   |   House Pets with Sandy Robins  


October 5, 2013

Could Your Pet Be Suffering From Canine Or Feline Acne?

If you’ve noticed what looked like grains of dirty on your cat or dog’s chin and automatically thought they’ve been digging in the dirt or playing in your pot plants, well, take a closer look ....

If you’ve noticed what looked like grains of dirty on your cat or dog’s chin and automatically thought they’ve been digging in the dirt or playing in your pot plants, well, take a closer look because they could be suffering from canine or feline acne.

It’s a relatively common problem and unlike in humans is not restricted to puberty but can be life-long. So its something that needs to be attended to tin order to control and prevent outbreaks.

It starts at around one year of age and may have periods of remission and periods of exacerbation. It often begins as tiny plugs of dark material, like blackheads, around the hair shafts of the chin and lower lip. When the area is infected it can get very itchy so watch for your pet rubbing her face with a paw or against a piece of furniture.

Some topical products used for human acne have been tried in cats with good success. They include topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, topical antibiotics and steroids.
Many pets develop yeast infections on their chins so topical antifungal creams are commonly recommended. Many of these products are over the counter and include topical miconazole and clotrimazole. These products are very safe in cats and dogs and are usually used twice daily for a minimum of two weeks. But please take advice from a veterinarian and don't rely on over-the counter advice!

At home, it’s also a good idea to soak the area with a cotton ball dipped in Epson salts to keep the area free of bacteria. Your veterinarian may also recommend that you wash the chin with medicated products once or twice weekly to remove the scabs and the excessive sebum from the skin. A contact time of 10 minutes is recommended.

In severe cases you may be required to administer systemic drugs. They include oral antibiotics, oral antifungal drugs, oral steroids or oral retinoids. The antibiotics are usually given for several weeks. They may cause stomach irritation and nausea causing loss of appetite (anorexia) and diarrhea. Antifungal drugs have the potential of inducing liver disease, thus any loss of appetite should immediately reported to your veterinarian. Other adverse effects include vomiting and diarrhea.

Interesting what your pet eats and drinks out of can exacerbate the condition and even cause an issue that resembles feline or canine acne. A lot of pets are allergic to plastic and plastic derivatives. So remove any plastic or resin type products and replace with ceramic, glass or stainless steel.




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