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 Friday, January 19th, 2018
House Pets with Sandy Robins
Features   |   On The House Show and Tell   |   House Pets with Sandy Robins  


September 28, 2013

Its World Rabies Day

Tips on when to vaccinate pets and when to give it a miss

The purpose of World Rabies Day is to raise awareness about the impact of human and animal rabies, how easy it is to prevent it, and how to eliminate the main global sources. Rabies is the deadliest disease on earth with a 99.9% fatality rate.

It’s a viral disease that is transmitted through the saliva or tissues from the nervous system from an infected mammal to another mammal.

Rabies is a zoonotic disease. Which means it can pass between species. Bird flu and swine flu are other zoonotic diseases.

The rabies virus attacks the central nervous system causing severely distressing neurological symptoms before causing the victim to die.

Each state has its own laws governing the administration of the rabies vaccine. Some areas require yearly rabies vaccination. Other areas call for vaccines every three years. An up-to-date canine rabies vaccination is a legal requirement. Be sure to keep proof of your dog’s rabies vaccines with his medical records.

When it comes to vaccinating pets against other diseases while vaccination has the potential to protect pets against life-threatening diseases, its not without its risks. Recently, there has been some controversy regarding the duration of protection and timing of vaccination, as well as the safety and necessity of certain vaccines.

Bottom line—vaccines are very important in managing the health of your dog. That said, not every dog needs to be vaccinated against every disease. It is very important to discuss with your veterinarian a vaccination protocol that’s right for your dog. Factors that should be examined include age, medical history, environment, travel habits and lifestyle. Most vets highly recommend administering core vaccines to healthy dogs.

According to the ASPCA’s website, in 2006, the American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Task Force published a revised version of guidelines regarding canine vaccinations. The guidelines divide vaccines into three categories—core, non-core and not recommended.

- Core vaccines are considered vital to all dogs based on risk of exposure, severity of disease or transmissibility to humans. Canine parvovirus, distemper, canine hepatitis and rabies are considered core vaccines by the Task Force.
- Non-core vaccines are given depending on the dog’s exposure risk. Your veterinarian can determine what vaccines are best for your dog.

Puppies should receive a series of vaccinations with a combination vaccine product that protects against parvovirus, distemper and hepatitis. Your puppy must also be vaccinated against rabies. There are a variety of other vaccines that may or may not be appropriate for your pet.

Your veterinarian can best determine a vaccination schedule for your dog. This will depend on the type of vaccine, your dog’s age, medical history, environment and lifestyle. Some adult dogs might receive certain vaccines annually, while other vaccines might be given every 3 years or longer.




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