OnTheHouse Express

. In This Issue… .
. .

. Sponsored By: .
.
Beam
Beam

Family Handyman
Family Handyman

Grip-Tite Wrenches
Grip-Tite Wrenches

QuietRock
QuietRock

LuciNow
LuciNow

Radon.com
Radon.com

Rebuilding Together
Rebuilding Together

SeriousWindows
SeriousWindows

Sun Heat
Sun Heat

.

. Other Ideas… .
.

Visit our forum for helpful tips and advice from other do-it-yourselfers! Click here.

Have an idea for our next newsletter? Send it our way!

Would you like to advertise on the On The House website or e-newsletter? Click here to tell us more!

To unsubscribe or change your subscription preferences, click here.


.



On The House Express
is brought to you in part by:

Premier_care.gif

Premier Care In Bathing

Beam Introduces Breakthrough in Central Vacuum Hose Management

.

“Homeowners love their central vacuum systems and the improved indoor air quality they get from a central vacuum, but they want more convenience, versatility and easier storage,’ says Brian Campbell, product line manager for Beam. “The Beam Q Power Team with the EasyReach Retractable Hose delivers all three.’

Unlike hose management products that require inside-the-wall installation and separate hoses for each inlet valve, the Beam Q EasyReach hose can be moved from inlet to inlet. The outer hose is only 13 feet long. When more hose length is required the user can release an inner hose to reach the full 30 feet. A simple push of a button on the handle then restores the hose to its 13-foot length by using the suction of the central vacuum system to retract the inner hose.

The EasyReach hose also is the only portable retractable hose that can operate an electric power brush. It also offers unmatched cleaning versatility.

With three levels of height adjustment the Beam Q PowerTeam™ assures the highest level of carpet cleaning effectiveness. Convenient on-board tools and a QuickRelease™ wand system make the Beam Q not only the quietest, but also the easiest to use central vacuum power team available.

The Beam Q PowerTeam with the EasyReach Retractable Hose is available from nearly 800 independent, installing Beam dealers throughout the U.S. To locate a Beam dealer, visit www.beam.com

Beam products are manufactured and marketed by Electrolux Central Vacuum Systems, the world’s largest producer of built-in vacuum systems. The company’s Beam, Electrolux and Eureka brands are sold in nearly 50 countries around the world. Electrolux Central Vacuum Systems is a division of Electrolux Home Care Products North America.


Declining hormonal levels

.

This decline in these vital hormones cause a reduction in protein biosynthesis leading to a loss in muscle mass and reduction in bone tissue regeneration causing a loss of bone mass.

Other effects include the decline in the metabolic rate which causes an increase in fat accumulation and a serious decline in various immune system functions, and increased rate of memory loss.

There are certain medical groups apposed to the use of DHEA, stating it has been shown to cause cancer.

A closer examination of these studies show that the high levels of DHEA given the test subjects are 1000 times higher than the dosage recommended at 25/50 mg @ day, to humans over the age of 40. Also these test animals did not even produce DHEA on their own.

If in doubt about using this important nutrient, consider 7 keto DHEA which has fewer hormonal effects and near the same benefits.

Live strong and long.

For more fitness tips and to order a copy of my ‘Living Proof’ DVD, go to www.overthehillfitness.com.

Getting the Chill Off Your Home

. Trying to keep your home comfortable while preventing your utility bill from going through the roof can be a balancing act.

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, a whopping 44 percent of the average American utility bill goes for heating and cooling. Clearly, this figure is less for more energy-efficient homes and more for drafty homes with gas-guzzling furnaces. That you can enjoy comfort and a low utility bill without taking additional steps to ensure these conditions is wishful thinking.

No matter what kind of heating system you have, you can save money and increase comfort by properly maintaining and upgrading your equipment. But remember, an energy-efficient furnace alone will not have as great an impact on your energy bills as using the whole-house approach. You may have a top-of-the-line, energy-efficient furnace, but if the ducts leak and are not insulated, and your walls, attic, windows and doors are not insulated, your energy bills will remain high.

By using proper equipment maintenance and upgrades with appropriate insulation, weatherization, and thermostat settings, you can cut your energy bills and greatly improve comfort.

Regardless of the type of heating system you have, keeping it in tiptop operating shape comes first. Replacing a dirty filter is one of the simplest and most obvious maintenance tasks. Clean or replace the filter monthly during the heating season. Depending upon the filter style, a new filter can cost from $1 to $5, but can reduce your heating bill between 1 percent and 4 percent. Moreover, a clogged filter can reduce airflow and thus the efficiency of the furnace.

On older furnaces, a loose fan belt that drives the blower is a common energy-waster. A furnace that makes a screeching sound when it kicks on is a sure sign or a loose or deteriorated fan belt. To inspect, adjust or replace the fan belt, simply remove the furnace front panel to expose the belt. Depress it with your finger; it should give no more than an inch (1-half to 3-quarters of an inch is normal). Use a wrench to loosen the fan motor adjustment bolt(s) and move the motor away to tighten the belt and closer to loosen it. These steps also can be used to replace a worn or damaged belt.

Are you heating your attic or crawl space? Crushed, deteriorating or damaged ducts are a tremendous source of wasted heat. Annually inspect the condition of the ducts, especially where sections are joined. Repair or replace damaged sections and ensure that all joints are airtight, using a metal duct tape. This metal reinforced tape is stronger than the traditional fabric duct tape.

Are some rooms too hot or too cold? Try adjusting the dampers at the registers (adjusting them closed in rooms that are too hot and opening them in rooms that are too cold). If your system has them, you can control the amount of air going through a warm-air duct by adjusting the dampers located within the ducts.

Perhaps your furnace needs a boost, a booster fan, that is. Booster fans can be used at either the register, within a duct, or at both locations. A register booster fan, found at most hardware stores for $25 to $50, is installed in place of the standard register cover. The fan is designed to kick in when it detects a small amount of warm air coming from the furnace.

If that doesn't do the trick, and you need more horsepower, consider installing a low-wattage in-duct booster fan. As the name implies, this booster fan is installed in the duct and is usually wired to the main furnace blower fan to kick on at the same time. It can also be wired to a separate thermostat or to a manual switch when more air is needed in a particular room. An in-duct booster fan will set you back a bit more than the register-mount model. Plan to spend about $200 to $500 for professional installation by a heating contractor.

Before running off to the hardware store or calling in a contractor, you might be able to take the chill off by simply moving a piece of furniture. Often, the return air duct (the duct that draws air into the furnace) and/or the register (the return air supply through which heat is delivered) are obstructed by a piece of furniture or heavy drapes prohibiting each from doing an efficient job. Making sure there is ample clearance in front of each of these registers can solve this. Plastic air deflectors can also be installed at locations where drapes or other window treatments impair the performance of supply registers.

There are many other steps that you can take to improve comfort and energy-efficiency:

  • Cut down on drafts by caulking and/or weather-stripping around windows and doors.
  • Check the condition of your insulation. Do you have enough, and is it in good condition? Compressed insulation loses its value. Many utility companies offer a free energy audit that uses infrared technology to identify heat loss.
  • Installing a setback thermostat will give you heat when you most need it and will shut the system off when no one is at home.
  • Turn down the thermostat. Turning the temperature down just one degree can reduce your heating bill by 2 percent to 3 percent. Thus, turning the thermostat down from 72F to 68F can reduce your heating bill by up to 12 percent. Set the thermostat for 62F at night or if you're at work, all day.
  • Close the fireplace damper when the fireplace is not in use.
  • Vacuum vents and registers, and have the furnace and ducts professionally cleaned.
  • Install decorative ceiling paddle fans and run them in the reverse direction to circulate hot air trapped at ceilings.
  • Open window coverings to allow sunshine in and to create natural air currents. Be sure to close them at night.
  • Finally, don't forget that one of the best ways to take the chill off is by throwing on a sweater.